Familiar Fraud: Five Ways to Help Protect Against It

Recent news reports have highlighted how hackers in places like Russia and China accessed the personal information of people in the United States and other countries.
But identity thieves also live closer to home.
Just ask victims of familiar fraud. In this scenario, someone you know—and likely trust—steals your identity.
Familiar fraud is more difficult to prevent because we are typically taught to trust our closest relatives and believe they wouldn’t hurt us.

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Revised data show hackers stole fingerprints of 5.6 million federal workers

The hackers who stole security dossiers from the Office of Personal Management also got the fingerprints of 5.6 million US federal employees.

US intelligence agencies have blamed China for the hacking against the office, which is the main custodian of the government’s most important personnel records, but it is unclear what group or organization engineered it. Before Wednesday, the agency had said it lost 1.1 million sets of fingerprints among the roughly 22 million individuals whose records were compromised.

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Hackers cash out directly from ATMs, don’t need to steal your card first

Hackers looking to steal money from ATMs have targeted your credit cards for years, trying to obtain access to it by hacking online services and retail shops. However, since more and more markets including America are adopting more secure payment methods like chip-and-PIN cards and mobile payments, some talented hackers are adapting their game accordingly.

Rather than trying to steal credit cards, clone them and only then try to obtain cash out of ATMs, some people are simply targeting the machines with malware that makes them spit out cash on command.

This isn’t the first time such ATM malicious programs have been discovered, but the level of sophistication is even higher….

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Careful, that PayPal-paid sale could be a scammer

PayPal and other online payment mechanisms are a target for identity thieves.

On the dark web at present, PayPal accounts are going for as little as 50 cents each, allowing criminals to assume compromised accounts to facilitate buying products from unsuspecting sellers.

Eighteen cases have been reported to iDcare over the past couple of months relating to sellers on eBay, Gumtree and other marketplaces that have fallen victim to a very simple and common scam.

Here’s how it works…

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Why Hackers Say Your Stolen Identity Is Only Worth $1

Criminals are selling your stolen personal data for as little as $1 on the “dark web,” a new report on Wednesday revealed.

The so-called dark web is a heavily encrypted part of the Internet that makes it difficult for authorities to detect the location or owners of a website. It is notorious for hosting marketplaces selling illegal items such as drugs.

Hackers responsible for data breaches at companies often put the information they have stolen on the dark web for others to buy and make use of for financial gain.

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Could an ‘unhackable kernel’ keep all computers safe from cyberattack?

AN AUTONOMOUS helicopter gunship is flying over a military base in Arizona. Suddenly, officers on the ground lose radio contact: hackers have taken control of an on-board computer. Could they fly the helicopter?

This has happened – well, almost. New Scientist can reveal that the US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) used this scenario in a drill to test the cybersecurity of an uncrewed Boeing Little Bird helicopter.

Despite the hackers being given unfettered access to the computer, and then trying their hardest to disable the helicopter – even crashing the computer – they could not disrupt critical systems. For DARPA, which is aiming to develop an “unhackable” drone by 2018 as part of its High-Assurance Cyber Military Systems (HACMS) programme, the drill was a success.

This isn’t just about the military, though. The software that kept the helicopter’s computer secure was at the heart of its operating system, and it could be just what the world needs to make everything from pacemakers to insulin pumps and power stations to cars immune to hacking.

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The price of your identity in the Dark Web? No more than a dollar

Stolen data is a hot commodity in the Internet underground — but how much it goes for might be a surprise.

Data breaches are becoming a weekly part of the news cycle, and so common the idea of our data being lost by companies which collect it, while still distressing, not as much of a surprise as it used to be.

The recent Ashley Madison and Hacking Team data breaches reveal just how damaging these kinds of cyberattacks…

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The Medical Identity Theft Apocalypse? Fear the Walking Files

Criminal cyber attacks on health care information repositories have increased 125 percent since 2010. With the announcement of the Excellus breach last week, the total number of big-headline medical information compromises reported in 2015 (such as Anthem, Primera, Carefirst) had crossed the mind-blowing demarcation line of 100 million files.

The Excellus breach exposed the names of clients as well as their dates of birth, Social Security numbers, mailing addresses, telephone numbers, member identification numbers, financial account information and claim information. In terms of the type of information compromised and the amount of it, this most recent mega medical information breach, estimated to affect as many as 10 million consumers, was negligibly smaller than the Premera compromise, which exposed 11 million records. Yet it received nowhere near the same amount of media attention.

The reason is something called breach fatigue.

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