FBI and DHS Warn of Security Risks from the Internet of Things

The FBI and Department of Homeland Security have issued alerts about, in essence, the modern Internet.

Their public service announcements concern security risks posed by the so-called Internet of Things, or IoT, a situation where everyday objects connect to a network.

Researchers this summer proved that connected items can endanger people driving cars and wearing pacemakers. The Defense Department secretary last week mentioned the inventors of the Internet have been working on security fixes for IoT.

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Pentagon is building a system that instantly detects security breaches

The Department of Defense wants to be able to combat cyberattacks before hackers get the chance to steal sensitive files and employees’ data, as well as access the country’s weapons systems. The only way the Pentagon can do that is to be more proactive in dealing with its computers’ and networks’ vulnerabilities.

That’s why it’s building an electronic system that can help them prioritize those flaws, according to how much threat they pose. While data entry will initially be done by hand, the military envisions its final form as an automated system that can instantly detect infiltration attempts and notify cyber response teams to stop them before they can wreak havoc.

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Internet of Things: Security is getting better, but far from secure

Connected devices are common all around the world today and becoming more and more common. In years past the only things that were typically networked were computers, tablets, and smartphones. That is all changing with cheap sensors and chips that allow literally anything to be placed on a network. Appliances are getting network capabilities for all sorts of new features.

Sensors that you can place on devices that didn’t initially come with IoT capability are available as well. The issues that surround the IoT are the same issues that surround any networked device with the big issue being privacy and security. Most people don’t want other people being able to access data from networked devices in their home or office.

The big concern is that something like your car or refrigerator that is networked might pose a security hole that allows nefarious users to access your network, potentially exposing your person data by giving access to devices on your network like computers that have personal information…

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This Facebook extortion scam is too horrifying for words

A Michigan man will spend the next 21 years in jail and 10 more years on probation after being convicted of one of the worst, most disgusting Internet crimes I’ve ever heard of. His terrible crime spree may be over, but someone else could use this scheme against your children or grandchildren.

James S. Allen, a 38-year-old from New Baltimore, was convicted of production of child pornography and cyberstalking after his elaborate online scheme.

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How You Can Fight Against the Rising Tide of Medical Identity Theft

While identity theft can take many forms, medical identity theft is not only a complex crime, but devastating for victims. A new report revealed the number of medical identity theft victims surged almost 22 percent in 2014, with more than 2 million victims total, according to the Medical Identity Fraud Alliance. The Fifth Annual Study on Medical Identity Theft found an upward trend of patients affected by medical identity theft that will likely continue into 2015 as hackers target the health care sector….

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84% Support Eliminating Passwords

LaunchKey, the leading mobile authentication platform, today released findings from a recent survey which found that password-based authentication is no longer capable of meeting the demands of modern information security. According to survey data, an overwhelming 84% of respondents would support eliminating passwords all together.

Additionally, more than three-fourths of those surveyed (76%) feel their data would be more secure with an alternative form of verification, with 59% preferring fingerprint scans over passwords.

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How to limit cyber risk with adaptive authentication

Risk-based, or adaptive authentication grew out of the recognition that single- and multiple-factor authentication methods were based on an erroneous assumption: that identity could be absolutely confirmed and, once confirmed, used as a basis of trust for all subsequent access decisions for the authenticated identity. It is clear that even the most robust multifactor authentication mechanisms do not give this level of assurance, though certainly one-time password methods are still most effective in approaching that goal.

In order to address this inherent limitation, adaptive approaches were developed that…

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