Security breach recovery has a huge price tag

In a recent Kaspersky Labs report: Damage Control: The Cost of Security Breaches, Kaspersky surveyed more than 5,500 companies in 26 countries to determine the cost of recovery from a security breach. Ninety percent of businesses admitted a security incident and forty percent of businesses surveyed lost sensitive data due to an internal or external security threat. On average, enterprises paid $551,000 dollars….

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Dissemination of Information in the Cyber Age

Traditionally, most organizations that took part in offensive and defensive operations from a combatant perspective kept vulnerability information within the confines of a need-to-know classification structure. Yet, the concept becomes reversed when dealing with vulnerability information regarding cyber systems. Any individual with access to the Internet can search for these vulnerabilities and find a….

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Verizon 2015 Data Breach Investigations Report Finds Cyberthreats Are Increasing in Sophistication

Verizon’s “2015 Data Breach Investigations Report,” reveals that cyberattacks are becoming increasingly sophisticated, but that many criminals still rely on decades-old techniques such as phishing and hacking. According to this year’s report, the bulk of the cyberattacks (70 percent) use a combination of these techniques and involve a secondary victim, adding complexity to a breach.

Another troubling area singled out in this year’s report is that many existing vulnerabilities remain open, primarily because security patches that have long been available were never implemented. In fact, many of the vulnerabilities are traced to 2007 — a gap of almost eight years.

As in prior reports, this year’s findings again pointed out what Verizon researchers call the “detection deficit” — the time that elapses between a breach occurring until it’s discovered. Sadly, in 60 percent of breaches, attackers are able to compromise an organization within minutes.

Yet the report points out that many cyberattacks could be prevented through a more vigilant approach to cybersecurity. “We continue to see sizable gaps in how organizations defend themselves,” said Mike Denning, vice president of global security for Verizon Enterprise Solutions

 

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Things Seniors Need to Know About Identity Theft (Pass it On)

The University of Tennessee Extension is promoting a new education campaign designed by the Federal Trade Commission to enlist people over 65 in the effort to recognize and report frauds and scams called Pass it On.

Pass It On reinforces what older people already know about some of today’s most common scams, and it gives them a short and straightforward way to share that knowledge with their family members, friends and communities. It focuses on their ability to be part of the solution instead of implying they’re part of the problem when it comes to scams.

Let’s discuss identity theft. Someone gets your personal information and runs up bills in your name. They might use your Social Security or Medicare number, your credit card, or your medical insurance – along with your good name.  How would you know?

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The Medical Identity Theft Apocalypse? Fear the Walking Files

Criminal cyber attacks on health care information repositories have increased 125 percent since 2010. With the announcement of the Excellus breach last week, the total number of big-headline medical information compromises reported in 2015 (such as Anthem, Primera, Carefirst) had crossed the mind-blowing demarcation line of 100 million files.

The Excellus breach exposed the names of clients as well as their dates of birth, Social Security numbers, mailing addresses, telephone numbers, member identification numbers, financial account information and claim information. In terms of the type of information compromised and the amount of it, this most recent mega medical information breach, estimated to affect as many as 10 million consumers, was negligibly smaller than the Premera compromise, which exposed 11 million records. Yet it received nowhere near the same amount of media attention.

The reason is something called breach fatigue.

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This Facebook extortion scam is too horrifying for words

A Michigan man will spend the next 21 years in jail and 10 more years on probation after being convicted of one of the worst, most disgusting Internet crimes I’ve ever heard of. His terrible crime spree may be over, but someone else could use this scheme against your children or grandchildren.

James S. Allen, a 38-year-old from New Baltimore, was convicted of production of child pornography and cyberstalking after his elaborate online scheme.

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Former Tesla engineer charged with hacking and leaking data

A former Tesla Motors mechanical engineer is facing federal charges in a San Jose District Court on two counts of felony computer intrusion, and one count of misdemeanor computer intrusion.

Authorities said Canadian citizen, Nima Kalbasi, accessed his former manager’s email account and got his hands on communications regarding Telsa employee evaluations and other confidential information, according to a FBI release.

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Millennials are rapidly losing trust when it comes to online security

Given the amount of data breaches and hacking that goes on these days, it’s not surprising to hear that a new piece of research has found that millennials are swiftly losing trust in the digital world.

Only 5 per cent believed their digital identity and personal data was “completely protected” by effective security measures.

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Next-Gen Cybersecurity Is All About Behavior Recognition

In the wake of devastating personal information leaks, like Target’s back in 2014 affecting more than 70 million customers and the more recent Ashley Madison data breach, concerns over cybersecurity are at an all-time high.

Financial advisers overwhelmingly cite cybersecurity as their number-one concern, with business owners and everyday consumers sharing in those worries.

There are a few ways to approach this problem, but the one on everyone’s mind is the most straightforward; we need to protect companies’ records from ever being breached in the first place.

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