Russia’s Plan to Crack Tor Crumbles

The Kremlin was willing to pay 3.9 million rubles ($59,000) to anyone able to crack Tor, a popular tool for communicating anonymously over the Internet. Now the company that won the government contract expects to spend more than twice that amount to abandon the project.

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Why Hackers Say Your Stolen Identity Is Only Worth $1

Criminals are selling your stolen personal data for as little as $1 on the “dark web,” a new report on Wednesday revealed.

The so-called dark web is a heavily encrypted part of the Internet that makes it difficult for authorities to detect the location or owners of a website. It is notorious for hosting marketplaces selling illegal items such as drugs.

Hackers responsible for data breaches at companies often put the information they have stolen on the dark web for others to buy and make use of for financial gain.

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Could an ‘unhackable kernel’ keep all computers safe from cyberattack?

AN AUTONOMOUS helicopter gunship is flying over a military base in Arizona. Suddenly, officers on the ground lose radio contact: hackers have taken control of an on-board computer. Could they fly the helicopter?

This has happened – well, almost. New Scientist can reveal that the US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) used this scenario in a drill to test the cybersecurity of an uncrewed Boeing Little Bird helicopter.

Despite the hackers being given unfettered access to the computer, and then trying their hardest to disable the helicopter – even crashing the computer – they could not disrupt critical systems. For DARPA, which is aiming to develop an “unhackable” drone by 2018 as part of its High-Assurance Cyber Military Systems (HACMS) programme, the drill was a success.

This isn’t just about the military, though. The software that kept the helicopter’s computer secure was at the heart of its operating system, and it could be just what the world needs to make everything from pacemakers to insulin pumps and power stations to cars immune to hacking.

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The price of your identity in the Dark Web? No more than a dollar

Stolen data is a hot commodity in the Internet underground — but how much it goes for might be a surprise.

Data breaches are becoming a weekly part of the news cycle, and so common the idea of our data being lost by companies which collect it, while still distressing, not as much of a surprise as it used to be.

The recent Ashley Madison and Hacking Team data breaches reveal just how damaging these kinds of cyberattacks…

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The Medical Identity Theft Apocalypse? Fear the Walking Files

Criminal cyber attacks on health care information repositories have increased 125 percent since 2010. With the announcement of the Excellus breach last week, the total number of big-headline medical information compromises reported in 2015 (such as Anthem, Primera, Carefirst) had crossed the mind-blowing demarcation line of 100 million files.

The Excellus breach exposed the names of clients as well as their dates of birth, Social Security numbers, mailing addresses, telephone numbers, member identification numbers, financial account information and claim information. In terms of the type of information compromised and the amount of it, this most recent mega medical information breach, estimated to affect as many as 10 million consumers, was negligibly smaller than the Premera compromise, which exposed 11 million records. Yet it received nowhere near the same amount of media attention.

The reason is something called breach fatigue.

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FBI and DHS Warn of Security Risks from the Internet of Things

The FBI and Department of Homeland Security have issued alerts about, in essence, the modern Internet.

Their public service announcements concern security risks posed by the so-called Internet of Things, or IoT, a situation where everyday objects connect to a network.

Researchers this summer proved that connected items can endanger people driving cars and wearing pacemakers. The Defense Department secretary last week mentioned the inventors of the Internet have been working on security fixes for IoT.

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Pentagon is building a system that instantly detects security breaches

The Department of Defense wants to be able to combat cyberattacks before hackers get the chance to steal sensitive files and employees’ data, as well as access the country’s weapons systems. The only way the Pentagon can do that is to be more proactive in dealing with its computers’ and networks’ vulnerabilities.

That’s why it’s building an electronic system that can help them prioritize those flaws, according to how much threat they pose. While data entry will initially be done by hand, the military envisions its final form as an automated system that can instantly detect infiltration attempts and notify cyber response teams to stop them before they can wreak havoc.

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Internet of Things: Security is getting better, but far from secure

Connected devices are common all around the world today and becoming more and more common. In years past the only things that were typically networked were computers, tablets, and smartphones. That is all changing with cheap sensors and chips that allow literally anything to be placed on a network. Appliances are getting network capabilities for all sorts of new features.

Sensors that you can place on devices that didn’t initially come with IoT capability are available as well. The issues that surround the IoT are the same issues that surround any networked device with the big issue being privacy and security. Most people don’t want other people being able to access data from networked devices in their home or office.

The big concern is that something like your car or refrigerator that is networked might pose a security hole that allows nefarious users to access your network, potentially exposing your person data by giving access to devices on your network like computers that have personal information…

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This Facebook extortion scam is too horrifying for words

A Michigan man will spend the next 21 years in jail and 10 more years on probation after being convicted of one of the worst, most disgusting Internet crimes I’ve ever heard of. His terrible crime spree may be over, but someone else could use this scheme against your children or grandchildren.

James S. Allen, a 38-year-old from New Baltimore, was convicted of production of child pornography and cyberstalking after his elaborate online scheme.

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