Why Hackers Say Your Stolen Identity Is Only Worth $1

Criminals are selling your stolen personal data for as little as $1 on the “dark web,” a new report on Wednesday revealed.

The so-called dark web is a heavily encrypted part of the Internet that makes it difficult for authorities to detect the location or owners of a website. It is notorious for hosting marketplaces selling illegal items such as drugs.

Hackers responsible for data breaches at companies often put the information they have stolen on the dark web for others to buy and make use of for financial gain.

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Could an ‘unhackable kernel’ keep all computers safe from cyberattack?

AN AUTONOMOUS helicopter gunship is flying over a military base in Arizona. Suddenly, officers on the ground lose radio contact: hackers have taken control of an on-board computer. Could they fly the helicopter?

This has happened – well, almost. New Scientist can reveal that the US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) used this scenario in a drill to test the cybersecurity of an uncrewed Boeing Little Bird helicopter.

Despite the hackers being given unfettered access to the computer, and then trying their hardest to disable the helicopter – even crashing the computer – they could not disrupt critical systems. For DARPA, which is aiming to develop an “unhackable” drone by 2018 as part of its High-Assurance Cyber Military Systems (HACMS) programme, the drill was a success.

This isn’t just about the military, though. The software that kept the helicopter’s computer secure was at the heart of its operating system, and it could be just what the world needs to make everything from pacemakers to insulin pumps and power stations to cars immune to hacking.

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The price of your identity in the Dark Web? No more than a dollar

Stolen data is a hot commodity in the Internet underground — but how much it goes for might be a surprise.

Data breaches are becoming a weekly part of the news cycle, and so common the idea of our data being lost by companies which collect it, while still distressing, not as much of a surprise as it used to be.

The recent Ashley Madison and Hacking Team data breaches reveal just how damaging these kinds of cyberattacks…

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FBI and DHS Warn of Security Risks from the Internet of Things

The FBI and Department of Homeland Security have issued alerts about, in essence, the modern Internet.

Their public service announcements concern security risks posed by the so-called Internet of Things, or IoT, a situation where everyday objects connect to a network.

Researchers this summer proved that connected items can endanger people driving cars and wearing pacemakers. The Defense Department secretary last week mentioned the inventors of the Internet have been working on security fixes for IoT.

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Internet of Things: Security is getting better, but far from secure

Connected devices are common all around the world today and becoming more and more common. In years past the only things that were typically networked were computers, tablets, and smartphones. That is all changing with cheap sensors and chips that allow literally anything to be placed on a network. Appliances are getting network capabilities for all sorts of new features.

Sensors that you can place on devices that didn’t initially come with IoT capability are available as well. The issues that surround the IoT are the same issues that surround any networked device with the big issue being privacy and security. Most people don’t want other people being able to access data from networked devices in their home or office.

The big concern is that something like your car or refrigerator that is networked might pose a security hole that allows nefarious users to access your network, potentially exposing your person data by giving access to devices on your network like computers that have personal information…

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How to limit cyber risk with adaptive authentication

Risk-based, or adaptive authentication grew out of the recognition that single- and multiple-factor authentication methods were based on an erroneous assumption: that identity could be absolutely confirmed and, once confirmed, used as a basis of trust for all subsequent access decisions for the authenticated identity. It is clear that even the most robust multifactor authentication mechanisms do not give this level of assurance, though certainly one-time password methods are still most effective in approaching that goal.

In order to address this inherent limitation, adaptive approaches were developed that…

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Russian Hackers Hijack Satellite To Steal Data from Thousands of Hacked Computers

A group of Russian hackers, most notably the Turla APT (Advanced Persistent Threat) is hijacking commercial satellites to hide command-and-control operations, a security firm said today.

Turla APT group, which was named after its notorious software Epic Turla, is abusing satellite-based Internet connections in order to:

  • Siphon sensitive data from government, military, diplomatic, research and educational organisations in the United States and Europe.
  • Hide their command-and-control servers from law enforcement agencies.

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Former Tesla engineer charged with hacking and leaking data

A former Tesla Motors mechanical engineer is facing federal charges in a San Jose District Court on two counts of felony computer intrusion, and one count of misdemeanor computer intrusion.

Authorities said Canadian citizen, Nima Kalbasi, accessed his former manager’s email account and got his hands on communications regarding Telsa employee evaluations and other confidential information, according to a FBI release.

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